Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Hand-painted advertising poster from the Japanese colonial era. The model has Taiwanese-style embroidery on her cuffs. 

Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)

I have tendinitis in both wrists and a sore throat (I assume the two maladies are not related), so I’ll just a link to my recent story about the Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫) on Xinyi Rd near Din Tai Fung and post some extra photos.

If you have followed my blog for a while, then you probably know about my intense love for Taiwan Storyland (台灣故事館). Unfortunately, Taiwan Storyland closed at the end of December. The management taped a sign on their door saying that they had to move because their lease had run out, but they haven’t answered repeated questions from fans on their Facebook page about when they plan to re-open.

The Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe is less tourist-oriented, but it also gives people a chance to look at items and documents related to Taiwan’s cultural and social history in a relaxed environment. Items from owner Lin Yu-fang’s (林于昉) collection are frequently displayed in museums around the country, but it is really nice to just sit with a cup of tea next to posters from the Japanese colonial era or stick my nose within inches of a carving from the Qing Dynasty. One of the reasons Lin started collecting in the early 1990s was because he feels the Taiwanese government and other collectors put so much emphasis on Chinese-style items that Taiwan’s own unique culture is ignored. He also preserves items that some people would rather toss, like brothel signs. The cafe is located in the former home of Lin’s parents, which means that it should be able to survive for as long as Lin wants to run it, since he doesn’t have to worry about making rent.

If you can’t make it to the cafe, check out their Facebook page. Staffers upload photographs and scans of old documents on a daily basis. For more information and the cafe’s address, please see my article.

Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Mural by famed Taiwanese artist Liao Chi-Chun (廖繼春), made in 1968 as a housewarming gift for Liao’s parents 

Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Land deed “signed” with a palm print 

Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Cafe owner Lin Yu-fang (林于昉) 

Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Glassware once used in shaved ice parlors 

Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
An example of the carved wooden or stone “barbarians” that were once a common feature in traditional Taiwanese architecture (and that can still be seen on many temple roofs)
Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Undershirt made from an old flour sack with anticommunist propaganda 

Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
A hand-drawn manuscript by comic artist Yeh Hong-chia (葉宏甲)
Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
A carving of the Virgin Mary with elements from Buddhist art 

Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Wooden carving used in beiguan (北管) music performances that combines Baroque, Japanese and Chinese motifs 

Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)

The cafe’s storage room with more than 10,000 items from Lin’s collection 

Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Formosa Vintage Museum Cafe (秋惠文庫)
Medicine bottles